How to Build Wealth Slowly

tortoise and the hare.jpg

“The best way to get rich quick is to get rich slow. The tortoise always beats the hare.” – Dave Ramsey

I see it pretty regularly; someone schedules a meeting and they start asking questions and kind of dancing around the topic of building wealth…fast. What they are looking for is an easy button (thank you, Staples). The truth is, the stories we hear of people doubling and tripling their money overnight, or even in a year, are rare and usually anomalies at best. However, all it takes is to hear one story about how my brother’s dentist’s daughter’s boyfriend bought some investment at $2.00 a share and now he’s a millionaire, and suddenly we have this epiphany, “Hey, maybe I should pick the exact right investment at the exact right time and put all my money in it, and by next year I’ll retire! Brilliant!” and then they look at me and say, “You can do that, right?”

No, I can’t and if I could I’d probably be on a secluded island not telling anyone how I figured out how to do it – no offense. What I can do is teach you how to build wealth, be generous, and leave a legacy of happiness and impact through persistence and patience. Yes, I know the first way sounds more fun, but I have thousands of success stories of families that built great wealth over time and I have maybe two stories of people that did it quickly. What do all of my success stories have in common? Work, time, and the willingness to follow a plan. Not always the same plan, but always some sort of plan.

Try to remember these three words – cheap, fast, great. In everything you do in life, you can only pick two of these words. So, if you want something fast, it cannot be both cheap and great. If you want it fast and great it is most likely going to cost more than you can pay. Wealth is no different.

Building wealth over time is also for our own good. It gives us time to gain wisdom and respect the wealth that was hard to build. The statistics around individuals that receive a windfall of money, like winning the lottery, suggest that without the respect for wealth that comes from working hard for it over a period time, we will most likely blow all the money and be back were we started from quickly.

In the business world there is a quote that says, “It only takes 20 years to become an overnight success.” I believe that to be true here. If you don’t have a lot of time left to build wealth, that’s okay. We can change the discussion and set realistic goals for what we can accomplish in the time we have. Remember, you don’t have to be rich to leave a legacy.

Step 1: Don’t go chasing waterfalls
Step 1.5: Call us
Step 2: Set realistic goals for your time frame
Step 3: Become informed and build a plan
Step 4: Execute the plan every day

Do You Have a PSP?

couple budgeting.jpg

Definition: PSP is a personal spending plan, a.k.a. a budget, a.k.a. I tricked you by not using budget in the title to get you to read a blog about budgeting. Look, I get it. Budgeting is hard, but I think it’s because we make it harder than it has to be. When I was going through my weight loss phase I was given a simple task: eat fewer calories than you burn each day. To be able to do that I had to know two things – how many calories am I burning and how many calories am I consuming? I didn’t do the really hard or complicated things like buying a food scale to measure out every calorie or visiting a lab to test my resting metabolic rate. Instead, I started with things that were easily accessible, like researching online to figure out a close guess of what my metabolic rate was and reading the labels of the food I was eating. I increased my exercise and decreased my calories and you know what happened? I lost weight. Budgeting or building a Personal Spending Plan is the exact same.

There’s no need to analyze every penny or to spend hours trying to figure out your equation. I performed a little research on Google which lead me to this website and found information on what an average family or individual is spending on certain budget categories. For example, I found that average family of four spends between $850-$1160 per month on groceries. Obviously, your family may be different, but if you are way above this range you should look at this category.

I have included a sample budget I found on the previously mentioned website that lists the percentages average families are spending on certain categories. Use this as base for how many dollars you should be spending in certain areas each month. Become aware of the money that you are spending. Most credit cards and banks have online tools that will tell you how much are spending in certain categories and by identifying your weak spots you will gain a better idea of where you need to cut back and where you can splurge.

Please know the chart below is based on data gathered nationwide and every family is different and there are many different belief systems that dictate what’s right for you.
If dieting was easy, everyone would look like Mario Lopez and if budgeting was easy, everyone would be rich. I don’t think budgeting will ever be fun, but it can be less complicated and it is so worth it. If you need help or just a kick in the pants, call me.

P.S. I lost 60 pounds in 5 months and I take very little credit because I was shown a plan and had proper coaching from people that wanted me to succeed. I want you to succeed too.

National Average Budget Category Percentages of Net Income

Category Percent of Overall Spending
Housing (mortgage/rent, Real estate taxes) 24%
Utilities (water, power, garbage collection, 8%
Food 14%
Clothing 4%
Medical/Healthcare 6%
Donations/Gifts to Charity 4%
Savings and Insurance 9%
Entertainment and Recreation 5%
Transportation (car payments, gas, service) 14%
Personal/Debt Payments/Misc 12%

 

Is Your Financial Advisor Broke?

Business man showing his empty pocketsOr maybe I should say, “Does your Financial Advisor practice what they preach?” I thought about this after a conversation with a friend whose brother is a financial advisor. He jokingly made a comment about how his brother has a pretty big practice, but he is actually broke. I probed a little to see what he meant and he explained that on the outside he looks the part. He has a nice car, nice wardrobe, great looking life on Facebook, but what that looked like behind closed doors was entirely different. He is living pay check to pay check, has no budget, is underfunded for retirement, and has too much debt. If these qualities were listed on your advisor’s resume would you still work with them?

I was 21 the first time someone told me, “fake it till you make it.” What a load of garbage! Unfortunately at 21, my brain didn’t work the way it does now and had I not recently read a book that warned me against this type of thought, I would have probably fell into the trap of trying to fund the lifestyle that made me look like I knew what I was doing when really I was going broke.

Now let me be clear – those young advisors that “fake it till they make it” aren’t doing it just because they want a luxury lifestyle. They are doing it because that’s what you want to see. If your advisor showed up to a meeting in a junky old car what would you think? Our culture celebrates the quantity of your wealth instead of the proper use of that wealth, and because of that, many people, including financial advisors are going broke.

There’s always two sides to any story, but I am going to address the fault on the financial advisor’s side. I am not making a blanket statement that says you can’t be in debt and have an underfunded retirement account and be a financial advisor. What I am saying is if a financial advisor has money problems, and that advisor is not following the same advice he gives his clients, then there is a problem. I encourage each of you to ask your financial advisor, “What is your current debt status and what is your plan?” Don’t ask them details. That may be none of your business, but at least know where they stand generally and do they have a plan to improve? You wouldn’t take fitness advice from someone who is out of shape, so don’t take financial advice from a financial advisor who is broke and unwilling to follow his own advice.

What Happens if You Can’t Work?

Man with his arm in a plaster cast writing

If you read my last post about life insurance and you’ve joined me again, thank you. Really, I am very thankful for your time and I hope these posts bring you value. Now, let’s get cooking. If you didn’t read the last post here’s question I asked, “Why do you have life insurance?” There are many valid reasons why someone has life insurance, but I think it’s funny that we call it LIFE insurance. I get it, but think about it. Do you buy life insurance because someone or something is literally dependent on your life? Like your heartbeat is the determining factor of the success of something or someone else. NO, that is not it at all. Life insurance is there because someone or something is dependent on you being alive so that you can earn income or provide value to the family. Think of it this way – if your income was guaranteed to pay out until age 67 whether you were alive or not, would you still buy life insurance?

So, what happens if you’re still alive but you can no longer earn income? Why do we spend so much time and money on life insurance but give no thought to what would happen if we were to become disabled.

69% of private sector workers do not have long-term disability coverage! That is a huge percentage of people. To throw another statistic at you – 1 in 4 people in their 20s will become disabled in their working years. To clarify, disabled means you can no longer earn your income. So, let’s think about the math. You stop earning income, but you’re still alive and need more care than before. Normal life – income + increased expenses = up the proverbial creek. If you have determined you need life insurance, you probably need disability insurance as well.

There are a lot of factors that go into deciding IF and HOW MUCH coverage you need so I highly recommend you talk to a professional about your personal situation. I hope you call us, but at least call someone. Today let’s assume you don’t have coverage and need some. There are two definitions you should know.

1) Short-Term Disability: Short-term disability coverage is just like it sounds; it generally starts to pay-out 2 weeks after your loss of income, but will generally only pay-out for around 6 months, then it goes away.

2) Long-Term Disability: Again as it sounds, it generally doesn’t start to pay-out for 90-180 days after your loss of income, but can pay-out all the way till age 65.

Which do I recommend? I am not a big fan of short-term disability insurance. I want you to have an emergency fund that would cover around 6 months of expenses. Then, in the case you become disabled, you would not need insurance to replace your income for 6 months. If you are a dual income family you can stretch that emergency fund out a little further. On the contrary, having long-term disability is a no brainer. Becoming disabled is a bigger financial risk to your family than dying! Sorry to be blunt but seriously, if you are disabled, you can become a drag on your family financially. Here are some things you need to know if you are not covered.

First, just like life insurance, you need to do a needs analysis. Most long-term policies will pay-out 60% of your current income (keep in mind that if you are paying your premiums yourself, that 60% payout is tax-free). 60% is probably close to your take-home pay now. However, if you are one of those super budgeters that live on much less than 60% of your income, then you may not need to pay for coverage that high.

Second, brace yourself. Disability insurance is not as cheap as term life insurance and it can get a bit complicated. Try to work with someone that is committed to educating you on all the options before making a recommendation. Industry terms like Owner Occ., Partial Occ., and others will get thrown around in your decision-making process and you need to understand what they mean in order to make the best decision.

Ultimately, if you have a need for life insurance because someone/something is depending on your income, you probably need disability insurance too. It’s not fun to talk about  but if something happens you and your family will be grateful you took the time to discover what’s right for you. If you find you need a partner for this, we would love to help.

 

Why Do You Have Life Insurance?

Person Hand Holding Puzzle With Question Mark

Why do you have life insurance? Is it because you have people that depend on you? Is it because you have debt that you don’t want others to inherit? Or is it because that’s what is normal and your parents told you to get it? Any of these three answers are acceptable. The real point of the question is to see if you actually know why you have insurance at all.

Recently, my partner Jamie challenged me that we need a better system to meet the insurance needs of our clients. Historically, it has never been a big part of my practice (ask me personally if you want to know why), but Jamie has pushed me to think about our clients and what is in their best interests. I’ve come to realize that we owe it to them to have a system built on education, a system that allows them to make informed decisions instead of directing them to an industry that is built to sell them a product. Boom. Gut check. Message received. As a side note here, always surround yourself with people better and smarter than you. I promise it’s more fun that way. Let’s talk shop and I’ll give you some personal thoughts along the way.

Let’s start with some definitions so we can cover the basics. For today, I’m going to break insurance into 2 categories: term life and cash value.

Term Insurance: You pay an insurance company to provide you with a death benefit of a fixed amount for a fixed period of time, i.e., $500,000 death benefit for a 30-year term. At the end of the term, if you are still kicking, nothing happens. The insurance goes away, you are no longer covered, and you stop paying premiums.

Cash Value: You pay an insurance company to provide you with a death benefit. The term is not fixed (in theory this could be until you pass away) and there is a component that builds cash value. Essentially this is a savings account that could pay you a fixed interest rate, or it might allow you to invest the balance, or it might be attached to something else that could contribute to its growth. If and when you decide you don’t want to pay for the death benefit any more you can take your cash value out and the growth will be taxable.

Now let’s talk about my opinion on insurance. In my experience, in most cases term life insurance is the best option. However, there are 3 cases in which cash value insurance is necessary.

1) You need permanent insurance. If you have children with special needs and they are likely to outlive you, then you may need some form of permanent insurance to protect them and provide for them after you pass away.

2) For estate protection. If your family estate is at risk of exceeding the Estate Tax Exemption Limit (2017 limit is $5,450,000) permanent life insurance can be used effectively to protect the estate.

3) Accumulation of assets. If you are a high-income earner and you have exhausted all other options for saving money in a tax efficient way. For example, you have maxed out your 401(k), maxed out non-deductible IRA/Backdoor Roth options, have a fully funded emergency fund, and you still need to save more of your income to get to a 15% savings rate, then cash value insurance could be a good option.

If you do not fall into one of these three categories then most likely term insurance is your best option. Unfortunately, the industry has decided that we can make a case for almost everyone to have cash value insurance, and so that’s what they do. It is important to note that cash value premiums are much higher than term. Yes, they have a savings component built in, but the cost of insurance is still there. Jamie and I have decided that we assume the opposite – we assume that we can meet your insurance needs with term insurance unless we can prove otherwise. So, step 1: go in with the assumption that term will work. Step 2) assess the need.

If I told you EVERYONE needs $500,000 of life insurance, what would be your response? “How do you know?” would be the best in my opinion. Every family has different needs. We factor in income, debts, future expenses, and a few other things to come up with your specific amount. It is not a one size fits all hat. So step 2 would be to determine the correct amount of coverage for your family and how long will you need that coverage. For the record, I believe uncovering these 2 factors will be a vital part of your full financial plan. You may not need life insurance past retirement age, but only if you have been preparing for that fact. I would recommend you think ahead and consider life insurance a part of your bigger financial picture.

In conclusion, you most likely need life insurance, and unless you have purchased your policy in the last 5 years, you need to review the insurance you have since the general cost of insurance has decreased recently. Think term first unless you fall into one of the previously mentioned categories or have another special circumstance. If you need cash value insurance, you are the exception, not the rule. Lastly, know why you have insurance, have a well-developed financial plan, and use insurance to protect your family and your assets, and buy it from someone you trust.

 

Facebook is Killing your Retirement

fb killing

This is not a Facebook bashing blog, I promise. I love Facebook; I’ve had a Facebook account since I was required to have a college email address to get an account, but it is killing your retirement. I could go into my thoughts about how it allows you to waste time and not reach your full potential, but today I am going to stick to the money side.

Remember that old saying, “Keeping up with the Joneses”? Well, Facebook has affectively created,” Keeping up with everyone that you have ever known in your entire life”. It is a beautiful tool that has allowed me to stay in touch with contacts that I would have long since lost in life. However, it has also taken my envious tendencies and allowed me to see every new car purchase, every new house warming party, every luxury vacation, every child’s birthday party and every college football tailgate that anyone I have ever known has experienced. I literally cannot open the app without at least once saying in my head, “what does that guy do for a living?! I know how much those cars cost”. I heard someone say one time “if it’s not on Facebook, did it really happen?” and I actually think we believe that. I have literally heard of people choosing their vacation destination based on the photos they plan to take and later share on Facebook.

Facebook is not bad, new homes and cars and birthday parties are not bad, college tailgates are not bad (assuming you are tailgating for a Clemson game), but living in this constant state of comparison is literally derailing your retirement plans and probably other aspects of your life as well. Every wonder why those people posting pictures of their new cars don’t post pictures of their 401(k) plans?

Make decisions that represent the fact that you care about more than other people’s possessions and opinions. Don’t get caught in the comparison trap; make smart decisions that benefit your family long term, and stop letting a Facebook post control your wallet.

Caleb Bagwell

 

Caleb Bagwell/Employee Education Specialist
John Maxwell Certified Leadership Coach
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
Toll-Free: 866.695.5162 / Office: 205.970.9088 
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 / Birmingham, AL 35242

Contact Caleb

Follow Caleb on LinkedIn

Follow Caleb’s Blog

Securities and advisory services offered through Commonwealth Financial Network, Member www.FINRA.org/www.SIPC.org, a Registered Investment Adviser.  This communication strictly intended for individuals residing in the states of AL, FL, GA, KY, LA, MD, MS, OK, PA, SC, TN, TX. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside these states due to various state regulations and registration requirements regarding investment products and services.

Why is Saving Money so D$#@ Hard?

Why is Saving Money so D$#@ Hard?

Life is full of decisions; daily, we make decisions on what to eat, what to wear, who to talk to at work, and believe it or not, we decide daily on whether to save money for retirement. What I mean by that is a decision to not decide on a savings plan is a decision to not save. Did you get that? Procrastination on your savings plan not only costs you real dollars with that whole compound interest thing, but it is an unconscious decision to put other priorities over your future goals.

This is probably not news to you and I am not trying to make you feel bad, all I am trying to do is help you understand why saving is so D$#@ hard, and why it’s worth the fight to get on track. First, why is it so hard? Well there are a few points I want to make here.

1) Science tells us that the brain has an incredibly hard time identifying with our future selves. In fact, saving money for retirement is essentially convincing yourself to save money for a stranger. Can you imagine a random guy walking up to you on the street and saying, “pardon me, good sir, could you spare a few dollars for my 401(k)?” Without having a clear picture of what your future goals are, this is literally the same scenario for your brain. To bridge that gap, I encourage you to sit down and think about what your future holds. College expense for kids, retirement at 67, or starting a business would all be good goals, but you have to get more specific. Which college and for how long? Bachelors, masters, PhD? Retire- where, to do what? Are you going to work part time, are you going to travel, will you volunteer? Where would you volunteer? What business? Oh, a coffee shop, great! What is your mission statement going to be? The point I am making here is that your future vision has to be HD quality to trick your brain into giving up luxuries now for something that is going to happen in the future. Think through the details and make your vision clear, then you will know what you are saving for.

2) The whole world is against you: I’m sorry this isn’t more upbeat but seriously, have you ever heard the saying YOLO, as in, you only live once? First of all, that’s not true, you will live for eternity in one of two places and acting a fool on this side of eternity because you think all the fun will be over when you die is a terrible idea. (Email me if you want to discuss this further). Secondly, YOLO is a common attitude that keeps people from saving. The society we live in is constantly after your dollars for new clothes, new cars, new houses, better schools, cooler vacations, better food at the latest hipster joint. Everywhere you turn, someone is trying to separate you from your wallet and it is only getting worse. None of those things, in and of themselves, are bad but honestly, it’s all a little overwhelming. This is where you have to learn to say NO to yourself and to everyone who is seeking to get to your dollars. John Maxwell taught me to see everything in trade-offs. When you make a decision to spend money today, start asking what this purchase will prevent you from doing in the future. You don’t have to do it on every purchase; I don’t find myself saying, “What will this delicious chic fil-a spicy chicken sandwich keep me from doing in the future?” But I ask myself about big purchases. What will spending $600 on mountain bike do to my savings plan and what will that mean for the rest of my spending for the year? The point is that you become intentional on your spending decisions as you begin to evaluate your true priorities.

3) Lastly, your competitive spirit, as it plays out on social media, puts you in a constant race. I will write more about this next week in my blog called Facebook is killing your 401(k). As for today, all you need to know is that keeping up with Joneses is not keeping up with everyone you ever knew because they are all on Facebook and post every purchase, every trip, every toy and every new car online for the world to see. How come no one ever posts about having a fully funded emergency fund or that they increased their 401k contribution to 15%? Why might that be considered vain, but a picture of me on my $5,000.00 vacation is total acceptable? Our constant need for approval and commonality is costing us money in the future because it affects our decisions today.

Savings does not happen by accident and believe me, it doesn’t get much easier as your income goes up. Don’t get me wrong, if you have 5 kids and make $50,000.00, you are probably not going to save 15% of your income. However, for 8 years, I have worked with people who say, “Well, if I could just get this raise, or if I just get that Christmas bonus, then I would save.” Liar! I’m calling you out right now, right here! I’ve seen year after year in meetings with families whose income was up, yet their saving had stagnated. Saving money is hard, so is losing weight, and so is recovering from a heart attack and having to work at age 75.

Make the effort, be intentional, get help if you need it.
Caleb Bagwell

Caleb Bagwell/Employee Education Specialist

John Maxwell Certified Leadership Coach
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
Toll-Free: 866.695.5162 / Office: 205.970.9088 
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 / Birmingham, AL 35242

Contact Caleb

Follow Caleb on LinkedIn

Follow Caleb’s Blog

 
Securities and advisory services offered through Commonwealth Financial Network, Member www.FINRA.org/www.SIPC.org, a Registered Investment Adviser.  This communication strictly intended for individuals residing in the states of AL, FL, GA, KY, LA, MD, MS, OK, PA, SC, TN, TX. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside these states due to various state regulations and registration requirements regarding investment products and services.

Education That Means Something to Your People

Video

 


Caleb BagwellCaleb Bagwell
/Employee Education Specialist

John Maxwell Certified Leadership Coach
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
Toll-Free: 866.695.5162 / Office: 205.970.9088 
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 / Birmingham, AL 35242

Contact Caleb

Follow Caleb on LinkedIn

Follow Caleb’s Blog


Securities and advisory services offered through Commonwealth Financial Network, Member www.FINRA.org/www.SIPC.org, a Registered Investment Adviser.  This communication strictly intended for individuals residing in the states of AL, FL, GA, KY, LA, MD, MS, OK, PA, SC, TN, TX. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside these states due to various state regulations and registration requirements regarding investment products and services.

I have plenty of time to hurry: the life of a procrastinator

I-have-plenty-of-time-to-hurry--the-life-of-a-procrastinator

Read the first part of that title carefully. It has, unfortunately, been an unwelcomed mantra of my life and it didn’t truly hit me until I unintentionally said it out loud. I was traveling from Texas to Alabama recently and as I exited the plane, I found myself behind an elderly gentleman. He was not moving as fast as the people in front of him so he politely turned to me and said, “You can go around.” Side note: Even though I am a Millennial, where I come from, your elder goes first, always. I smiled and said, “No, please sir, you go ahead, I have plenty of time to hurry.” It stopped me in my tracks, like literally. I stopped and actually laughed at myself because it hit me like a ton of bricks. That unintended slip of the tongue described the feeling that has haunted me since my first science fair project; sorry, Mom.

I’m not proud of it, but procrastinating has been something I have gotten very good at. I tend to work better under pressure. Having always viewed life in trade-offs, I analyze the due date of a task and compare it to the fun of the moment. In college, I would start every semester by telling myself, “This time will be different, this time I am going to stay ahead!” WRONG!! I wish I could tell you that the rest of this blog is going to be about how I overcame my bad habit by detailing the 6 steps to diminish procrastination, but that would be a lie. I do believe I am taking the right steps to conquer this malady but it is a work in progress. Let me tell you why this life course correction is worthy of my attention.

1) Procrastination is selfish: In school, if you procrastinated on a project, threw it together the night before and maybe got a D as your grade, you didn’t really hurt anyone except yourself and maybe the people you were rude to at the coffee shop at 11PM. But when you join the work force, your procrastination, many times, impacts other people. If it is late off your desk, it will be late off someone else’s desk and you may unintentionally cause them harm. I personally did this to a colleague recently when I waited to the last minute to finish a project which had to be formatted. Needless to say, I wasn’t the one doing the formatting. Only when I finished my task was the other team member able to start work and thereby forced to labor until midnight to get it done. That was a selfish move which I regretted.

2) Procrastination increases stress: You may say, “Caleb I know I am a procrastinator but it’s fine. I have figured out how to live with that.” To which I say, “Liar, liar pants on fire.” You may think you have figured out how to deal with it but ask those around you if they enjoy your company when you are working, last minute, on a deadline. I would venture to say you aren’t quite as pleasant if you know you are not going to sleep tonight. Stress can kill the positive connection with your peers, bosses, families, and employees. If the stress is preventable, PREVENT IT!

3) Procrastination steals Opportunity: The old quote goes, “Opportunity comes to the prepared.” If you are always procrastinating, you will eventually miss an opportunity. It may be that by the time you’re working on the project, you need more data and it’s too late to get it, or because you missed the deadline and therefore the opportunity went to someone else.  Eventually, procrastination catches up with you and it is not pretty.

You have heard me say this before. Stay in your zone, I want you to focus on your strength, but I also do not believe it is okay to ignore a weakness if a few minor tweaks can increase your effectiveness. Procrastination gives you a false sense of having time to do a task later, but in truth, you may not.  We are not promised tomorrow so whether it is at work or home, stop putting off till tomorrow what you have time to do today!

Caleb BagwellCaleb Bagwell/Employee Education Specialist
John Maxwell Certified Leadership Coach
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
Toll-Free: 866.695.5162 / Office: 205.970.9088 
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 / Birmingham, AL 35242

Contact Caleb

Follow Caleb on LinkedIn

Follow Caleb’s Blog

Securities and advisory services offered through Commonwealth Financial Network, Member www.FINRA.org/www.SIPC.org, a Registered Investment Adviser.  This communication strictly intended for individuals residing in the states of AL, FL, GA, KY, LA, MD, MS, OK, PA, SC, TN, TX. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside these states due to various state regulations and registration requirements regarding investment products and services.

Living for the “Ah ha” Moments – There is a Better Way!

 

Caleb BagwellCaleb Bagwell/Employee Education Specialist
John Maxwell Certified Leadership Coach
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
Toll-Free: 866.695.5162 / Office: 205.970.9088 
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 / Birmingham, AL 35242

Contact Caleb

Follow Caleb on LinkedIn

Follow Caleb’s Blog

Securities and advisory services offered through Commonwealth Financial Network, Member www.FINRA.org/www.SIPC.org, a Registered Investment Adviser.  This communication strictly intended for individuals residing in the states of AL, FL, GA, KY, LA, MD, MS, OK, PA, SC, TN, TX. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside these states due to various state regulations and registration requirements regarding investment products and services.